Author's Posts

enter site The Guardian, in November last year, tells story of Jean. Jean works for a home care agency in the north of England. She starts work at 6.30 am, and completes 23 calls in 12 hours. She drives 20 miles between appointments, and is not paid for her travel time, and earns £64.80 before tax. Jean is on a zero hours contract. She does not know how many appointments she will have each week, and therefore how much she will be paid. Her list of appointments comes through on a Friday. How can we change this and enable carers in home care to flourish?

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go to site Wellbeing Teams have five core values: Compassion, Responsibility, Curiosity, Creativity and Flourishing. How would these show up in the daily life of the team? Central to this is the context in which the teams operate and most importantly the headline purpose of the team which is ‘to support and connect older people with their community’. We arrived at ten key features of living the values, what matters to us as an organisation, to help make this explicit.

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http://www.lahdentaiteilijaseura.fi/?siftifkar=bin%C3%A4ra-optioner-tj%C3%A4na-pengar&235=6e Talk of being ‘values based’ abounds: values based recruitment, values based leadership, values based coaching, values based strategic planning; it would seem that lots of organisations are now doing ‘it’ and that ‘it’ is the thing to do. So that’s great – isn’t it?

binäre trades erfahrungen Thinking about the values underpinning Wellbeing Teams I wanted to make sure I understood what they really are, and to separate the truth from the hype. I asked Jackie LeFevre for help. Here is some of her wisdom on values, and how we worked together to develop the 5 core values of Wellbeing Teams.

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Carol works in the care sector visiting clients in their own homes for which she receives the National Minimum Wage and 7p a mile mileage. She has been doing it for three years, but says she is increasingly thinking of leaving because in her view the industry is getting worse. She says that the central frustration in her working life is not the pay, but that her employer schedules three half-hour visits every hour, meaning she is constantly late for each appointment and feels that she is short-changing the clients. This blog describes how Wellbeing Teams are trying to change Carol’s experience.

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If ISFs are so great, why are n’t there more of them? I asked commissioner Ann Lloyd, interim strategic commissioner, to share how she is creating the opportunity for ISFs in London, and her views from a commissioning perspective. She says,
“ISFs bring vital ingredients of flexibility, creativity and coordination. They are efficient building on the strengths of all involved. Providers take a key role and good plans help keep people’s families engaged. ISFs can help plan beyond immediate personal care needs (most using home care have multiple needs), be more organised, more flexible, listen to support staff who can pick up on issues. This improves care but could also help people avoid hospital or get home sooner, help reduce staff turnover and offer a supportive way for families and friends to be “part of the team”.”

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Martin Walker is the Policy Advisor for Personalised Commissioning and Self-directed support for TLAP. He leads on Individual Service Funds (ISFs) and over Social Care Curry a few weeks ago I was expressing my frustration that ISFs are still misunderstood and underused but potentially transformative for people and providers. Councils have a duty to offer Personal Budgets in all three of the specified ways under the Care Act, so why is this not happening? I asked Martin to help answer some questions about ISFs for this blog, and next week we are working together with NWADASS and TLAP to see if we can encourage and support people to use them more.

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Last week Community Integrated Care won best care home at the National Dementia Awards for their specialist home, EachStep Blackburn.

We have been partners with EachStep since before it opened; both through our work integrating Community Circles, and with our Associate Gill Bailey spending a day each week there to coach and support staff to implement person-centred practices. You can learn more about the partnership in this short film clip.

This great news has given us an appropriate point to reflect on our journey, and I’d like to share three reasons why I think EachStep is a real winner.

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This short animate describes how a Wellbeing Team supports Norma and Jean – but it is only half the story.

http://youtu.be/fnVyKoRTReY

Wellbeing Teams offer a fresh approach to home care, that is different in two ways: how people are supported and how the team works together. The ‘wellbeing’ in Wellbeing Teams stands for both people supported and for team members, you cannot do one without the other.

For the team this means being self-managing. As Daniel Pink, in his provocative book about motivation called Drive, says

“Ample research has shown that people working in self-organized teams are more satisfied” than those working in traditional teams.

This blog describes eight ways that self-managing Wellbeing Teams are structured and supported, providing the other half of the story.

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